12-month follow-up outcomes for youth departing an integrated residential continuum of care

Jay L. Ringle, Jonathan C. Huefner, Sigrid James, Robert Pick, Ronald W. Thompson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined the 12-month post-departure outcomes for youth who exited a residential treatment program at differing levels of restrictiveness. Study participants were 120 youth who entered an integrated residential continuum of care at its most restrictive level and then either departed the program at the same level or stepped down and departed at a lower level of restrictiveness. Results indicate that youth who stepped down and exited at the lowest level of restrictiveness were the most likely to be living at home or in a homelike setting and experienced fewer formal post-departure out-of-home placements. However, there were no differences in post-departure rates of substance use, arrests, or being in school or having graduated. These results suggest that youth who were served in the integrated continuum and departed at the lowest level of restrictiveness had more positive outcomes at 12-month post-discharge.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)675-679
Number of pages5
JournalChildren and Youth Services Review
Volume34
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2012

Keywords

  • Follow-up outcomes
  • Integrated continuum of care
  • Out-of-home follow-up
  • Residential care
  • Systems of care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

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