A Community-Based Cultural Adaptation Process: Developing a Relevant Cooking Curriculum to Address Food Security for Burundian and Congolese Refugee Families

Marissa McElrone, Sarah Colby, Lisa Franzen-Castle, Melissa D. Olfert, Kendra K. Kattelmann, Hillary N. Fouts, Marsha Spence, Katie Kavanagh, Adrienne A. White

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Refugee-specific nutrition and cooking curricula addressing dietary acculturation barriers to food security are limited. A cooking curriculum was culturally adapted for Burundian and Congolese refugees to address their unique dietary acculturation experiences. A four-phase curriculum adaptation process (information gathering [literature review, researcher informed, and formative interviews; n = 18], preliminary adaptation design [data incorporation and steering committee; n = 5], pilot testing [n = 10 youth/adult dyads], and refinement) was applied to the existing evidence-based iCook 4-H curriculum using a five-strategy (peripheral, evidential, linguistic, constituent-involving, and sociocultural) cultural adaptation framework. A multiphase, two-cycle coding analytic process was completed within NVivo 12, followed by direct content analysis. Seventeen adaptations were made to the iCook curriculum, derived from varying combinations of four data sources (literature review, researcher informed, priority population, and steering committee), applying all five cultural adaptation strategies. A majority of the curriculum adaptations were derived from two or more data sources (71%) and were categorized within multiple adaptation strategies (88%). This study provided a community-based cultural adaptation process that could be used with various populations to address unique barriers and facilitators to food security. This innovative model addresses cultural needs while simultaneously aiming to improve health habits of refugee communities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalHealth promotion practice
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • health disparities
  • health education
  • health promotion
  • minority health
  • nutrition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Nursing (miscellaneous)

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