A critical review of the acetaminophen preclinical carcinogenicity and tumor promotion data and their implications for its carcinogenic hazard potential

F. Jay Murray, Andrew D. Monnot, David Jacobson-Kram, Samuel M. Cohen, Jerry F. Hardisty, Suren B. Bandara, Michael Kovochich, Milind Deore, Suresh Kumar Pitchaiyan, Cathy K. Gelotte, John C.K. Lai, Evren Atillasoy, Anne Hermanowski-Vosatka, Edwin Kuffner, Kenneth M. Unice, Kyunghee Yang, Yeshitila Gebremichael, Brett A. Howell, Gary Eichenbaum

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

In 2019 the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) initiated a review of the carcinogenic hazard potential of acetaminophen, including an assessment of the long-term rodent carcinogenicity and tumor initiation/promotion studies. The objective of the analysis herein was to inform this review process with a weight-of-evidence assessment of these studies and an assessment of the relevance of these models to humans. In most of the 14 studies, there were no increases in the incidences of tumors in any organ system. In the few studies in which an increase in tumor incidence was observed, there were factors such as absence of a dose response and a rodent-specific tumor supporting that these findings are not relevant to human hazard identification. In addition, we performed qualitative analysis and quantitative simulations of the exposures to acetaminophen and its metabolites and its toxicity profile; the data support that the rodent models are toxicologically relevant to humans. The preclinical carcinogenicity results are consistent with the broader weight of evidence assessment and evaluations of multiple international health authorities supporting that acetaminophen is not a carcinogenic hazard.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number104801
JournalRegulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology
Volume118
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2020

Keywords

  • Acetaminophen
  • Animal model
  • Bioassay
  • Carcinogenicity
  • Metabolite
  • Pharmacokinetic
  • Tumor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology

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