A framework for comprehensive health terminology systems in the United States: Development guidelines, criteria for selection, and public policy implications

Christopher G. Chute, Simon P. Cohn, James R. Campbell

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

113 Scopus citations

Abstract

Health care in the United States has become an information-intensive industry, yet electronic health records represent patient data inconsistently for lack of clinical data standards. Classifications that have achieved common acceptance, such as the ICD-9-CM or ICD, aggregate heterogeneous patients into broad categories, which preclude their practical use in decision support, development of refined guidelines, or detailed comparison of patient outcomes or benchmarks. This document proposes a framework for the integration and maturation of clinical terminologies that would have practical applications in patient care, process management, outcome analysis, and decision support, Arising from the two working groups within the standards community - the ANSI (American National Standards Institute) Healthcare Informatics Standards Board Working Group and the Computer-based Patient Records Institute Working Group on Codes and Structures - it outlines policies regarding 1) functional characteristics of practical terminologies, 2) terminology models that can broaden their applications and contribute to their sustainability, 3) maintenance attributes that will enable terminologies to keep pace with rapidly changing health care knowledge and process, and 4) administrative issues that would facilitate their accessibility, adoption, and application to improve the quality and efficiency of American health care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)503-510
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American Medical Informatics Association
Volume5
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Informatics

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