A longitudinal study of student-teacher relationship quality, difficult temperament, and risky behavior from childhood to early adolescence

Kathleen Moritz Rudasill, Thomas G. Reio, Natalie Stipanovic, Jennifer E. Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

106 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examines the mediating role of student-teacher relationship quality (conflict and closeness) in grades 4, 5, and 6 on the relation between background characteristics, difficult temperament at age 41/2 and risky behavior in 6th grade. The longitudinal sample of participants (N=1156) was from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development. Structural equation modeling was used to estimate paths from (a) background characteristics to student-teacher relationship quality and risky behavior, (b) temperament to student-teacher relationship quality and risky behavior, and (c) student-teacher relationship quality to risky behavior. Findings indicate that students' family income, gender, receipt of special services, and more difficult temperament were associated with risky behavior. In addition, student-teacher conflict was a mediator. Students with more difficult temperaments were more likely to report risky behavior and to have conflict in their relationships with teachers. More conflict predicted more risky behavior. Closer student-teacher relationships were associated with less risky behavior. Results suggest negative relationships, specifically student-teacher relationships, may increase the risk that certain adolescents will engage in risky behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)389-412
Number of pages24
JournalJournal of School Psychology
Volume48
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2010

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Maladaptive risk-taking
  • Structural equation modeling
  • Student-teacher relationships
  • Temperament

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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