A longitudinal study of the association between persistent pathogens and incident depression among older U.S. Latinos

Amanda M. Simanek, Cheng Zheng, Robert Yolken, Mary Haan, Allison E. Aiello

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Depression is estimated to affect more than 6.5 million Americans 65 years of age and older and compared with non-Latino whites older U.S. Latinos have a greater incidence and severity of depression, warranting further investigation of novel risk factors for depression onset among this population. We used data on 771/1,789 individuals ≥60 years of age from the Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging (1998-2008) who were tested for cytomegalovirus (CMV), herpes simplex virus, varicella zoster, Helicobacter pylori, Toxoplasma gondii, and C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) level. Among those without elevated depressive symptoms at baseline, we examined the association between each pathogen, inflammatory markers and incident depression over up to nearly 10 years of follow-up using discrete-time logistic regression. We found that only CMV seropositivity was statistically significantly associated with increased odds of incident depression (odds ratio [OR]: 1.38, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.00-1.90) in the total sample as well as among women only (OR: 1.70, 95% CI: 1.01-2.86). These associations were not mediated by CRP or IL-6 levels. Our findings suggest that CMV seropositivity may serve as an important risk factor for the onset of depression among older U.S. Latinos, but act outside of inflammatory pathways.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)634-641
Number of pages8
JournalJournals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
Volume74
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2019

Keywords

  • Cytomegalovirus
  • Gender
  • Inflammation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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