A Mixed-Methods Feasibility Study: Eliciting ICU Experiences and Measuring Outcomes of Family Caregivers of Patients Who Have Undergone Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

Natalie S. McAndrew, Jeanne Erickson, Breanna Hetland, Jill Guttormson, Jayshil Patel, Lyndsey Wallace, Alexis Visotcky, Anjishnu Banerjee, Allison J. Applebaum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The impact of an intensive care unit (ICU) admission on family caregivers of patients who have undergone hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has not been well described. Aims of this study were to determine the feasibility of conducting research with family caregivers of HSCT patients during an ICU admission and generate preliminary data about their experiences and engagement in care. Using a mixed-methods, repeated measures design, we collected data from family caregivers after 48 hr in the ICU (T1) and at 48 hr after transferring out of ICU (T2). Enrolling HSCT caregivers in research while in the ICU was feasible (10/13 consented; 9/10 completed data collection at T1); however, data collection at T2 was not possible for most caregivers. Caregiver distress levels were high, and engagement in care was moderate. The three themes that emerged from interviews (n = 5) highlighted that although HSCT family caregivers faced many challenges and received limited support during their ICU experience, they were able to access their own personal resources and demonstrated resilience.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)227-247
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Family Nursing
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2023

Keywords

  • adults
  • experiences
  • family
  • family caregivers
  • family engagement
  • hematopoietic stem cell transplant
  • intensive care unit

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Community and Home Care
  • Family Practice

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