A multi-level analysis of the impact of neighborhood structural and social factors on adolescent substance use

Abigail A. Fagan, Emily M. Wright, Gillian M. Pinchevsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: This paper examined the effects of neighborhood structural (i.e., economic disadvantage, immigrant concentration, residential stability) and social (e.g., collective efficacy, social network interactions, intolerance of drug use, legal cynicism) factors on the likelihood of any adolescent tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana use. Methods: Analyses drew upon information from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN). Data were obtained from a survey of adult residents of 79 Chicago neighborhoods, two waves of interviews with 1657 to 1664 care-givers and youth aged 8 to 16 years, and information from the 1990 U.S. Census Bureau. Hierarchical Bernoulli regression models estimated the impact of neighborhood factors on substance use controlling for individual-level demographic characteristics and psycho-social risk factors. Results: Few neighborhood factors had statistically significant direct effects on adolescent tobacco, alcohol or marijuana use, although youth living in neighborhoods with greater levels of immigrant concentration were less likely to report any drinking. Conclusion: Additional theorizing and more empirical research are needed to better understand the ways in which contextual influences affect adolescent substance use and delinquency.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)180-186
Number of pages7
JournalDrug and Alcohol Dependence
Volume153
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2015

Keywords

  • Adolescent substance use
  • Multi-level analysis
  • Neighborhood context

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology
  • Pharmacology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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