A review of self-management interventions targeting academic outcomes for students with emotional and behavioral disorders

Paul Mooney, Joseph B. Ryan, Brad M. Uhing, Robert Reid, Michael H. Epstein

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

113 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of this review was to report on the effectiveness and focus of academic self-management interventions for children and adolescents with emotional and behavioral disorders. Twenty-two studies published in 20 articles and involving 78 participants met inclusionary criteria. The overall mean effect size (ES) across those studies was 1.80 (range -0.46 to 3.00), indicating effects were generally large in magnitude and educationally meaningful. Self-monitoring interventions were the predominant type of self-management technique used by researchers. The mean ES for intervention types were self-evaluation (1.13), self-monitoring (1.90), strategy instruction techniques (1.75), self-instruction techniques (2.71), and multiple-component interventions (2.11). Interventions targeted improvement in math calculation skills more than any other area. The mean ES by academic area were math interventions (1.97), writing (1.13), reading (2.28), and social studies (2.66). There was evidence to support a claim of the generalization and maintenance of findings. Implications, limitations, and areas for future research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)203-221
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Behavioral Education
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2005

Keywords

  • Academic outcomes
  • Emotional and behavioral disorders
  • Self-management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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