A systematic evaluation of food textures to decrease packing and increase oral intake in children with pediatric feeding disorders

Meeta R. Patel, Cathleen C. Piazza, Stacy A. Layer, Russell Coleman, Dana M. Swartzwelder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined packing (pocketing or holding accepted food in the mouth) in 3 children who were failing to thrive or had inadequate weight gain due to insufficient caloric intake. The results of an analysis of texture indicated that total grams consumed were higher when lower textured foods were presented than when higher textured foods were presented. The gram intake was related directly to levels of packing. That is, high levels of packing were associated with higher textured foods and low gram intake, and low levels of packing were associated with lower textured foods and high gram intake. All participants gained weight when texture of foods was decreased. Packing remained low during follow-up for 2 participants even when the texture of food was increased gradually over time. These data are discussed in relation to avoidance, response effort, and skill deficit.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)89-100
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of applied behavior analysis
Volume38
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2005

Keywords

  • Avoidance
  • Packing
  • Pediatric feeding disorders
  • Texture assessment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Philosophy
  • Applied Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'A systematic evaluation of food textures to decrease packing and increase oral intake in children with pediatric feeding disorders'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this