A Textile Dressing for Temporal and Dosage Controlled Drug Delivery

Pooria Mostafalu, Gita Kiaee, Giorgio Giatsidis, Akbar Khalilpour, Mahboobeh Nabavinia, Mehmet R. Dokmeci, Sameer Sonkusale, Dennis P. Orgill, Ali Tamayol, Ali Khademhosseini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

60 Scopus citations

Abstract

Chronic wounds do not heal in an orderly fashion in part due to the lack of timely release of biological factors essential for healing. Topical administration of various therapeutic factors at different stages is shown to enhance the healing rate of chronic wounds. Developing a wound dressing that can deliver biomolecules with a predetermined spatial and temporal pattern would be beneficial for effective treatment of chronic wounds. Here, an actively controlled wound dressing is fabricated using composite fibers with a core electrical heater covered by a layer of hydrogel containing thermoresponsive drug carriers. The fibers are loaded with different drugs and biological factors and are then assembled using textile processes to create a flexible and wearable wound dressing. These fibers can be individually addressed to enable on-demand release of different drugs with a controlled temporal profile. Here, the effectiveness of the engineered dressing for on-demand release of antibiotics and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is demonstrated for eliminating bacterial infection and inducing angiogenesis in vitro. The effectiveness of the VEGF release on improving healing rate is also demonstrated in a murine model of diabetic wounds.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1702399
JournalAdvanced Functional Materials
Volume27
Issue number41
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 3 2017

Keywords

  • biotextiles
  • flexible wound dressings
  • smart wound dressings
  • stimuli-responsive drug delivery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics

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