AAC technology transfer: An AAC-RERC report

Jeffery D. Higginbotham, David Beukelman, Sarah Blackstone, Diane Bryen, Kevin Caves, Frank Deruyter, Thomas Jakobs, Janice Light, David McNaughton, Bryan Moulton, Howard Shane, Michael S. Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Transferring innovative technologies from the university to the manufacturing sector can often be an elusive and problematic process. The Rehabilitation and Engineering Research Center on Communication Enhancement (AAC-RERC) has worked with the manufacturing community for the last 10 years. The purpose of this article is to discuss barriers to technology transfer, to outline some technology transfer strategies, and to illustrate these strategies with AAC-RERC related activities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)68-76
Number of pages9
JournalAAC: Augmentative and Alternative Communication
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

Keywords

  • Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC)
  • Knowledge Transfer
  • Technology Transfer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Speech and Hearing

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'AAC technology transfer: An AAC-RERC report'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Higginbotham, J. D., Beukelman, D., Blackstone, S., Bryen, D., Caves, K., Deruyter, F., Jakobs, T., Light, J., McNaughton, D., Moulton, B., Shane, H., & Williams, M. S. (2009). AAC technology transfer: An AAC-RERC report. AAC: Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 25(1), 68-76. https://doi.org/10.1080/07434610902724886