AACR centennial series: The biology of cancer metastasis: Historical perspective

James E. Talmadge, Isaiah J. Fidler

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

613 Scopus citations

Abstract

Metastasis resistant to therapy is the major cause of death from cancer. Despite almost 200 years of study, the process of tumor metastasis remains controversial. Stephen Paget initially identified the role of host-tumor interactions on the basis of a review of autopsy records. His "seed and soil" hypothesis was substantiated a century later with experimental studies, and numerous reports have confirmed these seminal observations. An improved understanding of the metastatic process and the attributes of the cells selected by this process is critical for the treatment of patients with systemic disease. In many patients, metastasis has occurred by the time of diagnosis, so metastasis prevention may not be relevant. Treating systemic disease and identifying patients with early disease should be our goal. Revitalized research in the past three decades has focused on new discoveries in the biology of metastasis. Even though our understanding of molecular events that regulate metastasis has improved, the contributions and timing of molecular lesion(s) involved in metastasis pathogenesis remain unclear. Review of the history of pioneering observations and discussion of current controversies should increase understanding of the complex and multifactorial interactions between the host and selected tumor cells that contribute to fatal metastasis and should lead to the design of successful therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5649-5669
Number of pages21
JournalCancer Research
Volume70
Issue number14
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 15 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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