Academic Outcomes and Stress in Full-Time Day and Part-Time Evening Baccalaureate Nursing Students

Priscilla C. O'Connor, Catherine A. Bevil

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined differences in stress and academic outcomes in generic baccalaureate nursing students enrolled in a full-time day program and those enrolled in a part-time evening program. The study also sought to identify the relationship between stress and academic outcomes and between selected demographic variables and stress in these two groups of nursing students. Day and evening students did not differ on trait or state anxiety scores measured at the beginning of the semester; by mid-semester, state anxiety scores increased in evening students only. Nevertheless, no relationship between stress and academic outcomes was found in either group. Of the demographic variables examined, age and number of dependents were related to stress. There was no relationship between hours employed and stress scores. Students enrolled in an evening nursing program were able to achieve academic outcomes comparable to their day counterparts despite reporting greater stress and more hours spent in employment each week. The high stress reported by both day and evening students has implications for the development of support programs and stress reduction interventions in nursing schools.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)245-251
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Nursing Education
Volume35
Issue number6
StatePublished - Sep 1996

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Nursing
  • Education

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