Acculturative Stress, Social Support, and Coping: Relations to Psychological Adjustment Among Mexican American College Students

Lisa J. Crockett, Maria I. Iturbide, Rosalie A. Torres Stone, Meredith McGinley, Marcela Raffaelli, Gustavo Carlo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

270 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined the relations between acculturative stress and psychological functioning, as well as the protective role of social support and coping style, in a sample of 148 Mexican American college students (67% female, 33% male; mean age = 23.05 years, SD = 3.33). In bivariate analyses, acculturative stress was associated with higher levels of anxiety and depressive symptoms. Moreover, active coping was associated with better adjustment (lower depression), whereas avoidant coping predicted poorer adjustment (higher levels of depression and anxiety). Tests of interaction effects indicated that parental support and active coping buffered the effects of high acculturative stress on anxiety symptoms and depressive symptoms. In addition, peer support moderated the relation between acculturative stress and anxiety symptoms. Implications for reducing the effects of acculturative stress among Mexican American college students are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)347-355
Number of pages9
JournalCultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2007

Keywords

  • Mexican American college students
  • acculturative stress
  • coping
  • psychological distress
  • social support

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

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