Achievement of adequate glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes and comorbid mental health conditions treated in a primary care setting

Kaitlyn Brown, Katherine Fortenberry, Lisa Gren, Karen Gunning, Carrie McAdam-Marx

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective. This study investigated the association between the presence of a mental health condition (MHC) diagnosis and glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes in a primary care clinic network. Methods. This retrospective cross-sectional study compared adequate glycemic control (A1C <8.0%) in patients with type 2 diabetes with and without any MHC, as well as by MHC subtypes of depression or anxiety, bipolar or schizophrenia disorders, and substance use disorder. Results. Of 3,025 patients with type 2 diabetes, 721 (24%) had a diagnosis for one or more MHC. The majority (54.9%) were <65 years of age, female (54.9%), and Caucasian (74.5%). Mean A1C was statistically lower in the MHC cohort at 7.14 ± 1.66% compared to 7.38 ± 1.73% in the group without any MHC (P = 0.001). Furthermore, those with an MHC were more likely to attain adequate glycemic control than those without an MHC (odds ratio 1.27, 95% CI 1.01-1.59). Among patients with MHCs, similar rates of adequate glycemic control were seen between those with depression or anxiety and those with other MHCs. However, fewer patients with substance use disorder had adequate glycemic control compared to those without this condition (66.7 vs. 80.10%, P = 0.004). Conclusion. Patients with diabetes and MHCs had slightly better glycemic control than those without any MHC. However, the presence of substance use disorder may present more barriers to adequate glycemic control. Additional research is needed to identify barriers unique to each MHC to optimize diabetes management in this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)277-287
Number of pages11
JournalDiabetes Spectrum
Volume30
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2017
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

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