Acute effects of a thermogenic nutritional supplement on energy expenditure and cardiovascular function at rest, during low-intensity exercise, and recovery from exercise

Eric D. Ryan, Travis W. Beck, Trent J. Herda, Abbie E. Smith, Ashley A. Walter, Jeffrey R. Stout, Joel T. Cramer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

2009-The purpose of present study was to examine the acute effects of a thermogenic nutritional supplement on energy expenditure (EE) and cardiovascular function at rest, during low-intensity exercise, and recovery from exercise. Twenty-eight healthy sedentary participants (mean ± SD; age, 22.3 ± 1.9 years; body mass index, 24.0 ± 3.7) volunteered for this randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Each experimental trial was divided into 4 phases: (a) 30 minutes of initial resting, followed by the placebo or thermogenic nutritional supplementation, (b) 50 minutes of postsupplementation resting, (c) 60 minutes of treadmill walking (3.2-4.8 km h-1), and (d) 50 minutes of postexercise recovery. Gas exchange variables measured by indirect calorimetry and heart rate (HR) were recorded during all 4 phases, blood pressure was only measured at rest, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) was only recorded during exercise. EE and oxygen consumption rate (Vo2) were greater for the supplement than the placebo at 50 minutes after supplementation. Also, during the postsupplementation period, diastolic blood pressure (DBP) was higher at all time periods, whereas the respiratory exchange ratio (RER) was higher at 20 and 30 minutes for the supplement. During exercise, only Vo2 and minute ventilation (VE) were greater for the supplement than the placebo, with HR being less than the placebo at 20 minutes for the men. Postexercise EE, Vo 2, systolic blood pressure (SBP), DBP, and HR (men only) at 10, 20, 30, and 50 minutes were greater for the supplement than the placebo. These findings indicated that the thermogenic nutritional supplement increased resting EE and exercise Vo2 with only minimal effects on blood pressure and HR and no meaningful effects on RER or RPE. These results suggested that the combination of thermogenic ingredients in this nutritional supplement may be useful to help maintain a negative caloric balance but may not influence substrate use or perceived exertion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)807-817
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of strength and conditioning research
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2009

Keywords

  • Blood pressure
  • Caffeine
  • Capsaicin
  • Oxygen consumption rate
  • Thermogenesis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

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