Adverse outcomes associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease are rare following an apparent life-threatening event

Gabrielle Zimbric, Joshua L. Bonkowsky, W. Daniel Jackson, Christopher G. Maloney, Rajendu Srivastava

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate for adverse outcomes associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) following an apparent life-threatening event (ALTE) and potential risk factors of these outcomes. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study of well-appearing infants (<12 months) admitted for ALTE. Patients were followed for adverse outcomes associated with GERD (including aspiration pneumonia, failure-to-thrive, or anti-reflux surgery), second ALTE, or death. Risk factors evaluated included: age, prematurity, gender, previous event, diagnosis of GERD, gastrointestinal (GI) testing positive for gastroesophageal reflux, length of stay (LOS), and neurologic impairment diagnosed in follow-up. RESULTS: Four hundred sixty-nine patients met inclusion criteria, mean age was 45 days, 110 (22%) were premature. Patients were followed for an average of 7.8 years; 3.8% of all patients had an adverse outcome associated with GERD. The only significant risk factors were a longer LOS, and development of neurological impairment. A diagnosis of GERD and positive reflux testing during the initial hospitalization were not associated with adverse outcomes associated with GERD. CONCLUSIONS: Adverse outcomes associated with GERD are rare following an ALTE. Patients who developed neurological impairment and a longer initial LOS were at higher risk for developing these outcomes. Positive testing for gastroesophageal reflux during hospitalization for ALTE did not predict adverse outcomes associated with GERD. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2012;

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)476-481
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of hospital medicine
Volume7
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Leadership and Management
  • Internal Medicine
  • Fundamentals and skills
  • Health Policy
  • Care Planning
  • Assessment and Diagnosis

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