Age and Adaptive Functioning in Children and Adolescents with ASD: The Effects of Intellectual Functioning and ASD Symptom Severity

Trenesha L. Hill, Sarah A.O. Gray, Jodi L. Kamps, R. Enrique Varela

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present study examined the moderating effects of intellectual functioning and ASD symptom severity on the relation between age and adaptive functioning in 220 youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Regression analysis indicated that intellectual functioning and ASD symptom severity moderated the relation between age and adaptive functioning. For younger children with lower intellectual functioning, higher ASD symptom severity was associated with better adaptive functioning than that of those with lower ASD symptom severity. Similarly, for older children with higher intellectual functioning, higher ASD symptom severity was associated with better adaptive functioning than that of those with lower ASD symptom severity. Analyses by subscales suggest that this pattern is driven by the Conceptual subscale. Clinical and research implications are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4074-4083
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Volume45
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Adaptive functioning
  • Age
  • ASD symptom severity
  • Autism spectrum disorder
  • Intellectual functioning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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