Analysis of curcumin and piperine in biological samples by reversed-phase liquid chromatography with multi-wavelength detection

Elliott L. Rodriguez, Chenhua Zhang, Ashley G. Woolfork, Zhao Li, Cong Bi, Harleen Kaur, Anthony F. Juritsch, Régis Moreau, David S. Hage

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Widely accessible food phytochemicals such as curcumin have been reported to have anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic properties. However, curcumin has poor absorption in the gut, and piperine has been of interest as a dietary compound that can enhance curcumin bioavailability. The aim of this study was to develop and optimize a technique using reversed-phase chromatography with multi-wavelength detection for the simultaneous measurement of curcumin and piperine in various biological matrices. Emodin was used as an internal standard. Protein precipitation and liquid-liquid extraction based on acetonitrile provided good recovery of these analytes. A 150 mm × 4.6 mm I.D. Luna C18 column was used under isocratic conditions to separate curcumin, piperine, and emodin with baseline resolution, and with good separation from other sample components, in as little as 4 min. The detection limits for curcumin and piperine were 3 and 7 ng/mL, respectively. This method has been used to quantitate these compounds in samples such as human intestinal epithelial cell lysates and mouse plasma or GI tissues in research aimed at examining the bioavailability of curcumin in the presence of piperine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number122487
JournalJournal of Chromatography B: Analytical Technologies in the Biomedical and Life Sciences
Volume1162
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2021

Keywords

  • Chemopreventative agent
  • Curcumin
  • Multi-wavelength detection
  • Piperine
  • Reversed-phase chromatography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Biochemistry
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology

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