Arrests among homeless and runaway youths: The effects of race and gender

Kevin A. Yoder, Ed A. Muñoz, Les B. Whitbeck, Dan R. Hoyt, Barbara J. McMorris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined the contributions of race and gender to the likelihood of a first post-run arrest for a more serious and less serious offense in a sample of homeless and runaway youths from four Midwestern states. Event history analysis was used to test the hypothesis that race and gender would interact so that the likelihood of a first post-run arrest for a more serious and less serious offense would be highest for non-white males and non-white females, respectively. Potentially confounding factors—deviant subsistence strategies, substance use, gang involvement and membership, prior arrests, age, prior physical abuse, age on own, and spending time on the street—were controlled in the analyses. The hypotheses regarding the interaction of race and gender were not supported by the data. Non-whites were more likely than whites, and males were more likely than females, to be arrested for a more serious offense, and white females were more likely than non-white females to be arrested for a less serious offense.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)35-58
Number of pages24
JournalJournal of Crime and Justice
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Law

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