Assessing cultural assimilation of Mexican Americans: How rapidly do their gender-role attitudes converge to the U.S. mainstream?

Dejun Su, Chad Richardson, Guang Zhen Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: This study assesses the pace of cultural assimilation of Mexican Americans by comparing changes in their gender-role attitudes over generations to the European-origin U.S. mainstream. Methods: Using cumulative data from the 1972-2004 General Social Survey, we examine the rate at which progressive generations of Mexican Americans approach the mainstream gender-role attitudes. We also employ a set of logistic regressions to assess the differences in gender-role attitudes between Mexican and European Americans. Results: For five out of the eight gender-role-related questions considered in the study, Mexican Americans of the third or later generations show more liberal or egalitarian gender-role attitudes than those of the first or second generations. A comparison between Mexican and European Americans suggests that Mexican Americans in the sample have more conservative gender-role attitudes than European Americans in terms of division of labor at home and women's participation in politics. Conclusion: Mexican Americans become more likely to adopt egalitarian gender-role attitudes as generation progresses. The differences between Mexican and European Americans in terms of gender-role attitudes are sensitive to the particular domains of attitudes under consideration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)762-776
Number of pages15
JournalSocial Science Quarterly
Volume91
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

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