Assessment of the current computer literacy and future computer needs of emergency medicine residents and faculty

Daniel J. Debehnke, Verena T. Valley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to assess the current computer literacy and future computer needs of emergency medicine residents and faculty to aid in developing a computer literacy curriculum. All emergency medicine residents and full-time faculty from a random sample of emergency medicine residencies were mailed questionnaires assessing current computer familiarity and future computer needs. Twenty-one residencies were surveyed; 15 resident and 17 faculty questionnaires were returned. Thirty-seven percent (116 of 314) faculty and 29% (135 of 470) resident questionnaires were completed and returned. Eighty percent (12 of 15) of residencies had a designated computer for resident use; 93% (14 of 15) had a computer for use in the emergency department. Forty-seven percent of residents owned their own computer; 68% of faculty had a computer in their home, and 52% had computers in their office. Less than 30% of residents and faculty had formal computer training. Residents and faculty rated the current familiarity and future needs for various software applications on a five-point scale. Data were analyzed using the Wilcoxon-Rank Sum Test. Residents and faculty had the most anticipated need for word processing, graphics, literature searching, data base, and patient management programs. Future computer need was rated significantly higher than current computer familiarity in all computer application areas (P ≤ .0002). It seems that emergency medicine residents and faculty have adequate access to computers, but minimal computer training. Residents and faculty have a high anticipated need for various basic computer applications. Despite recent recommendations that computer literacy be taught in medical school, many emergency medicine residents and faculty have not been taught basic computer applications. Until a uniform knowledge base is taught in undergraduate medical education, a residency-based computer curriculum is necessary to teach basic computer applications to those without previous computer training.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)371-373
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Emergency Medicine
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1993

Keywords

  • Computer literacy
  • emergency medicine education
  • microcomputers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Assessment of the current computer literacy and future computer needs of emergency medicine residents and faculty'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this