Association between prenatal socioeconomic disadvantage, adverse birth outcomes, and inflammatory response at birth

Amanda M. Simanek, Meng Xiong, Jennifer M.P. Woo, Cheng Zheng, Yuan S. Zhang, Helen C.S. Meier, Allison E. Aiello

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Prenatal socioeconomic disadvantage is associated with inflammation in mid- to late-life, yet whether a pro-inflammatory phenotype is present at birth and the role of adverse birth outcomes in this pathway remains unclear. We utilized data on prenatal socioeconomic disadvantage at the individual- (i.e., mother's and father's education level, insurance type, marital status, and Women, Infants, and Children benefit receipt) and census-tract level as well as preterm (< 37 weeks gestation) and small-for-gestational-age (SGA) (i.e., < 10th percentile of sex-specific birth weight for gestational age) birth status, and assessed inflammatory markers (i.e., C-reactive protein, serum amyloid p, haptoglobin, and α-2 macroglobulin) in archived neonatal bloodspots from a Michigan population-based cohort of 1000 neonates. Continuous latent variables measuring individual- and combined individual- and neighborhood-level prenatal socioeconomic disadvantage were constructed and latent profile analysis was used to create a categorical inflammatory response variable (high versus low) based on continuous inflammatory marker levels. Structural equation models were used to estimate the total and direct effect of prenatal socioeconomic disadvantage on the inflammatory response at birth as well as indirect effect via preterm or SGA birth (among term neonates only), adjusting for mother's age, race/ethnicity, body mass index, smoking status, comorbidities, and antibiotic use/infection as well as grandmother's education level. There was a statistically significant total effect of both individual- and combined individual- and neighborhood-level prenatal socioeconomic disadvantage on high inflammatory response among all neonates as well as among term neonates only, and a positive but not statistically significant direct effect in both groups. The indirect effects via preterm and SGA birth were both negative, but not statistically significant. Our findings suggest prenatal socioeconomic disadvantage contributes to elevated neonatal inflammatory response, but via pathways outside of these adverse birth outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number106090
JournalPsychoneuroendocrinology
Volume153
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2023

Keywords

  • Inflammation
  • Lifecourse
  • Neonatal
  • Prenatal
  • Socioeconomic disadvantage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology
  • Endocrine and Autonomic Systems
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

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