Association of Ankle Sprain Frequency With Body Mass and Self-Reported Function: A Pooled Multisite Analysis

Adam B. Rosen, Abbis Jaffri, Andrew Mitchell, Rachel M. Koldenhoven, Cameron J. Powden, John J. Fraser, Janet E. Simon, Matthew Hoch, Christopher J. Burcal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Context: Ankle sprains result in pain and disability. While factors such as body mass and prior injury contribute to subsequent injury, the association of the number of ankle sprains on body anthropometrics and self-reported function are unclear in this population. Therefore, the purpose of this investigation was to assess differences in anthropometric measurements and self-reported function between the number of ankle sprains utilizing a large, pooled data set. Design: Cross-sectional. Methods: Data were pooled from 14 studies (total N = 412) collected by the Chronic Ankle Instability Outcomes Network. Participants were categorized by the number of self-reported sprains. Anthropometric data and self-reported function were compared between those who reported a single versus >1 ankle sprain as well as among groups of those who had 1, 2, 3, 4, and ≥5 ankle sprains, respectively. Results: Those who had >1 ankle sprain had higher mass (P = .001, d = 0.33) and body mass index (P = .002, d = 0.32) and lower Foot and Ankle Ability Measure-Activities of Daily Living (P < .001, r = .22), Foot and Ankle Ability Measure-Sport (P < .001, r = .33), and Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool (P < .001, r = .34) scores compared to the single ankle sprain group. Those who had a single ankle sprain weighed less than those who reported ≥5 sprains (P = .008, d = 0.42) and had a lower body mass index than those who reported 2 sprains (P = .031, d = 0.45). Conclusions: Some individuals with a history of multiple ankle sprains had higher body mass and self-reported disability compared to those with a single sprain, factors that are likely interrelated. Due to the potential for long-term health concerns associated with ankle sprains, clinicians should incorporate patient education and interventions that promote physical activity, healthy dietary intake, and optimize function as part of comprehensive patient-centered care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1000-1005
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of sport rehabilitation
Volume31
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2022

Keywords

  • body mass index
  • chronic ankle instability
  • patient-reported outcome measures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation

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