Association of habits, triggers, glycaemic control, routines, stress and impulse control among emerging adults with type 1 diabetes

K. M. Hanna, Kevin A Kupzyk, J. R. Hansen, M. L. Jones-Ryan, Andjela T Drincic

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Aim: Glycaemic control is known to be poor among emerging adults with type 1 diabetes, but the reasons for this are poorly understood. Examination of diabetes self-management-related habits, triggers and daily routines within the context of impulse control and perceived daily stress may provide increased understanding of glycaemic control during this transitional period. This study examined associations among checking blood glucose (CBG) habits, eating a meal (EAM) habits and glycaemic control within the context of CBG triggers, daily routines, impulse control and perceived daily stress, in emerging adults with type 1 diabetes. Methods: A cross-sectional convenience sample of 100 emerging adults with type 1 diabetes was recruited from an outpatient diabetes care clinic for this age group. Participants self-reported frequency of CBG and EAM habits, CBG triggers, daily routines, perceived daily stress and impulse control. Glycaemic control values were obtained from medical records. Path analysis was performed. Results: Better glycaemic control was positively and significantly associated with greater frequency of CBG and EAM habits. CBG habits were positively and significantly associated with CBG triggers and EAM habits. EAM habits were positively and significantly associated with daily routines. Conclusions: We suggest interventional research targeting CBG and EAM habits and daily routines to examine the impact on diabetes self-management and glycaemic control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalDiabetic Medicine
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

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