Attitudes toward communication modes and message formulation techniques used for storytelling by people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

Melanie Richter, Laura J. Ball, David R. Beukelman, Joanne Lasker, Cara Ullman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Two investigations were completed regarding attitudes toward components of AAC used to tell stories by people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (people with ALS). In Study 1, the attitudes of three groups of listeners (people with ALS, caregivers, and unfamiliar listeners) toward three communication modes (unintelligible natural speech, communication notebook, and synthesized speech) were examined. The listener groups viewed videotapes of people with ALS delivering three narratives, each with one of three different communication modes. In study 2, attitudes of three groups of listeners toward three message formulation techniques (word-by-word, sentence-by-sentence, and complete narrative) used for storytelling were examined. Listeners viewed videotapes of people with ALS using synthesized speech to tell three narratives, each with one of three different message formulation techniques. Results for both studies indicated agreement among the individuals who used AAC and listener groups, and a strong preference for AAC use by people with ALS when speech becomes unintelligible. A need for features in AAC devices allowing for larger message 'capture' and 'retrieval' capabilities is suggested.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)170-186
Number of pages17
JournalAAC: Augmentative and Alternative Communication
Volume19
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2003

Keywords

  • AAC
  • ALS
  • Attitudes
  • Communication
  • Message formulation
  • Narratives
  • Storytelling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Speech and Hearing

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