Atypical predictive processing during visual statistical learning in children with developmental dyslexia: an event-related potential study

Sonia Singh, Anne M. Walk, Christopher M. Conway

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Previous research suggests that individuals with developmental dyslexia perform below typical readers on non-linguistic cognitive tasks involving the learning and encoding of statistical-sequential patterns. However, the neural mechanisms underlying such a deficit have not been well examined. The aim of the present study was to investigate the event-related potential (ERP) correlates of sequence processing in a sample of children diagnosed with dyslexia using a non-linguistic visual statistical learning paradigm. Whereas the response time data suggested that both typical and atypical readers learned the statistical patterns embedded in the task, the ERP data suggested otherwise. Specifically, ERPs of the typically developing children (n = 12) showed a P300-like response indicative of learning, whereas the children diagnosed with a reading disorder (n = 8) showed no such ERP effects. These results may be due to intact implicit motor learning in the children with dyslexia but delayed attention-dependent predictive processing. These findings are consistent with other evidence suggesting that differences in statistical learning ability might underlie some of the reading deficits observed in developmental dyslexia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)165-179
Number of pages15
JournalAnnals of Dyslexia
Volume68
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2018

Keywords

  • Developmental dyslexia
  • ERPs
  • Implicit learning
  • Sequential learning
  • Statistical learning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Speech and Hearing

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