Barriers and Opportunities for Promoting Health Professions Careers among Latinxs in the Midwest

Patrik Johansson, Sonja Tutsch, Keyonna King, Armando De Alba, Elizabeth Lyden, Melissa Leon, Dan Schober

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Latinx populations experience health disparities and are underrepresented among health professionals. One strategy to address these health disparities includes increasing the proportion of Latinx health professionals. The purpose of this study was to examine barriers and facilitators for Latinxs in pursuing health professions careers in a Midwestern state experiencing dramatic increases in Latinx populations, especially in rural areas. We conducted focus groups with Latinx high school, undergraduate, and graduate health professions students in rural and urban settings to examine barriers and opportunities for promoting health professions careers. Although many of our results confirm findings from other studies, novel future directions for this work should include comprehensive interventions that span the health professions education pipeline, including interventions that engage Latinx parents. A need also exists for increased representation of Latinx science teachers, counselors, staff, faculty, and particularly senior administrators in academic settings, from high school to graduate health professions schools to serve as role models, mentors, and advocates for Latinx health professions students. Educational programming of this magnitude requires institutional commitment to diversity, driven by leadership, with an explicit commitment to workforce and student diversity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Latinos and Education
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • Science education
  • latino/a children and families
  • newcomer
  • parent and community
  • post-secondary education
  • qualitative research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • Education

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