Behavior compensation reduces loads in the cervical spine measured with a force-sensing implant

C. W. Helder, M. B. Grabowsky, R. A. Wachs, E. Leimer, K. Cole, A. Dubin, J. C. Glennon, E. H. Ledet

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Low back pain is growing health concern affecting 31 million Americans at any given time. Many of the risk factors for low back pain are mechanical in nature. Characterizing the axial loads, muscle recruitment, and behavior compensation during everyday motion an important step in minimizng the mechanical risk factors. The purpose of this study was to use an interbody implant to analyze the intradiscal forces in an in vivo model during everyday activities and to monitor the effect of behavior compensation on the resulting loads.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2011 IEEE 37th Annual Northeast Bioengineering Conference, NEBEC 2011
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011
Event37th Annual Northeast Bioengineering Conference, NEBEC 2011 - Troy, NY, United States
Duration: Apr 1 2011Apr 3 2011

Publication series

Name2011 IEEE 37th Annual Northeast Bioengineering Conference, NEBEC 2011

Other

Other37th Annual Northeast Bioengineering Conference, NEBEC 2011
CountryUnited States
CityTroy, NY
Period4/1/114/3/11

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering

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