Behavioral and electrophysiological indices of voicing-cue discrimination: Laterality patterns and development

Panagiotis G. Simos, Dennis L. Molfese, Rebecca A. Brenden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Scopus citations

Abstract

Voicing is an important phonetic dimension that distinguishes voiced (i.e., /b/) from voiceless-aspirated stop consonants (i.e., /p(b)/) in English. Perception of discrete voicing categories is affected by a number of acoustic cues. The present paper reviews evidence from brain-damaged populations indicating that the perception of certain voicing cues is less dependent upon left hemisphere mechanisms than the ability to perceive place of articulation contrasts (e.g., /b/ vs. /d/). In addition, electrophysiological and dichotic listening studies with neurologically normal individuals support the view that the right hemisphere may play a special role in the categorical processing of voicing. These findings are discussed in relation to current models of hemispheric specialization and laterality for language.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)122-150
Number of pages29
JournalBrain and Language
Volume57
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1997

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Speech and Hearing

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