Behavioral Health Problems Presented to Integrated Pediatric Behavioral Health Clinics: Differences in Urban and Rural Patients

Shinobu Watanabe-Galloway, Rachel Valleley, Katherine Rieke, Brittany Corley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Behavioral health diagnoses and service use may differ based on rurality. The purpose of this study was to examine the patterns of mental disorder diagnoses of urban, rural, and remote pediatric populations. This retrospective study used electronic medical records from integrated behavioral health clinics in Nebraska from 2012 to 2013. Bivariate and multivariable models were used to examine the differences in diagnoses. Adolescents with attention deficit and related disorders were more likely to be male, younger, have public insurance and rural/remote residents. Adjustment disorders were associated with being female, older, and urban residents. Adolescents with anxiety disorder had a significant interaction between age and gender, with both genders being older, having private insurance, and urban residents. Adolescents with mood disorder were more likely to be female, older, and urban residents. Demographic and clinical differences among patients in urban and rural/remote settings have implications for care in rural settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)27-33
Number of pages7
JournalCommunity Mental Health Journal
Volume53
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • Emotional and behavioral problems
  • Integrated behavioral/primary care
  • Pediatric

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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