Biochemical detection of small intestinal allograft rejection by elevated circulating levels of serum intestinal fatty acid binding protein

W. H. Marks, G. Gollin, J. S. Thompson, A. G. Tzakis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background. Intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP) was investigated as a serum marker for acute intestinal allograft rejection. Its behavior was compared with that of another putative marker of intestinal damage, hexosaminidase. Methods. Transplants were performed in three groups of rats: group 1, Lewis to Lewis; group 2, ACI to Lewis, no immunosuppression; and group 3, ACI to Lewis with cyclosporine given on posttransplant days 0 through 5. Daily serum I-FABP and hexosamidase levels were quantitated and serial graft biopsy specimens were obtained. Results. Serum I-FABP levels fell to 20 ng/ml or less in all animals between posttransplant days 3 and 4. In group 1, I-FABP levels remained at baseline throughout the experiment. In group 2, I-FABP levels rose dramatically on either day 6 or 7 and declined to baseline within 4 days of the peak. On the day that I-FABP levels increased, findings of biopsy specimens were consistent with early rejection. In group 3 the rise in serum I-FABP levels was delayed 2 to 10 days. Hexosaminidase did not correlate with rejection. Conclusions. Serum I-FABP content correlated with early histologic manifestations of rejection. Hexosaminidase was insensitive as a marker in this model. I-FABP, which has a human analog, has potential as a biochemical marker for early intestinal allograft rejection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)206-210
Number of pages5
JournalSurgery
Volume114
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1993

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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