Blood Pressure Variability After Cerebrovascular Events: A Possible New Therapeutic Target: A Narrative Review

Maximiliano A. Hawkes, Craig S. Anderson, Alejandro A. Rabinstein

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Blood pressure variability, the variation of blood pressure during a certain period, results from the interaction of hemodynamic, neuronal, humoral, behavioral, and environmental factors. Cerebral autoregulation is impaired in acute cerebrovascular disease. Hence, increased blood pressure variability (BPV) may provoke or exacerbate secondary brain injury. In fact, available data showed that increased blood pressure variability is associated with worse outcomes after acute ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, and aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Consequently, BPV may represent a usual modifiable therapeutic target. This concept is particularly attractive because reduction of BPV can be feasible in regions with lower resources and can be applicable to patients with various forms of acute stroke. Prospective studies are needed to further clarify the relationship between BPV and secondary brain damage and the determinants of BPV in different clinical populations. Ultimately, cerebrovascular disease-specific randomized controlled trials aimed at reducing BPV, irrespective of the absolute blood pressure values, are needed to determine whether reduction of BPV can improve outcomes in patients with acute cerebrovascular disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)150-160
Number of pages11
JournalNeurology
Volume99
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 26 2022

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

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