Breast cancer subtypes: Two decades of journey from cell culture to patients

Xiangshan Zhao, Channabasavaiah B Gurumurthy, Gautam Malhotra, Sameer Mirza, Shakur Mohibi, Aditya Bele, Meghan G. Quinn, Hamid Band, Vimla Band

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Recent molecular profiling has identified six major subtypes of breast cancers that exhibit different survival outcomes for patients. To address the origin of different subtypes of breast cancers, we have now identified, isolated, and immortalized (using hTERT) mammary stem/progenitor cells which maintain their stem/progenitor properties even after immortalization. Our decade long research has shown that these stem/progenitor cells are highly susceptible to oncogenesis. Given the emerging evidence that stem/progenitor cells are precursors of cancers and that distinct subtypes of breast cancer have different survival outcome, these cellular models provide novel tools to understand the oncogenic process leading to various subtypes of breast cancers and for future development of novel therapeutic strategies to treat different subtypes of breast cancers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationHuman Cell Transformation
Subtitle of host publicationRole of Stem Cells and the Microenvironment
EditorsJohng Rhim, Richard Kremer
Pages135-144
Number of pages10
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011

Publication series

NameAdvances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Volume720
ISSN (Print)0065-2598

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

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    Zhao, X., Gurumurthy, C. B., Malhotra, G., Mirza, S., Mohibi, S., Bele, A., Quinn, M. G., Band, H., & Band, V. (2011). Breast cancer subtypes: Two decades of journey from cell culture to patients. In J. Rhim, & R. Kremer (Eds.), Human Cell Transformation: Role of Stem Cells and the Microenvironment (pp. 135-144). (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology; Vol. 720). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-0254-1_11