Burdock leaf and B&W ointment: A natural and suitable alternative to negative pressure wound therapy and skin grafting in the treatment of traumatic crush injury post surgical debridement

Erin Whiteford, Shahab Abdessalam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Alternative therapies to current medicinal practices are becoming increasingly popular in today's culture. We explored the efficacy of using burdock leaves and Burn and Wound (B&W) ointment as an alternative to negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) and skin grafting in a Mennonite pediatric patient post traumatic crush injury and surgical debridement. Although burdock leaves and B&W have been used for decades in treating minor burns and wounds, there is little literature describing their use in the treatment of traumatic injury that would otherwise require full thickness skin grafting. This case demonstrated a collaborative approach between physicians and a Mennonite healer to treat a complex traumatic wound. This unique approach was effective in healing the wound, albeit slightly slower than conventional therapy, and resulted in less pain due to dressing changes. Here, we describe an effective and safe alternative therapy for select patients who desire avoidance of numerous operations and prefer to attempt a more natural healing process. Additional information is included to educate providers on a therapy that significantly reduces the pain and trauma associated with dressing changes and decreases hospital time and costs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number101751
JournalJournal of Pediatric Surgery Case Reports
Volume65
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Alternative therapies
  • Negative pressure wound therapy
  • Skin grafts

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Surgery

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