Cardiometabolic comorbidities and epithelial ovarian cancer risk among African-American women in the African-American Cancer Epidemiology Study (AACES)

Jeanine N. Staples, Lauren C. Peres, Fabian Camacho, Anthony J. Alberg, Elisa V. Bandera, Jill Barnholtz-Sloan, Melissa L. Bondy, Michele L. Cote, Ellen Funkhouser, Patricia G. Moorman, Edward S. Peters, Ann G. Schwartz, Paul D. Terry, Joellen M. Schildkraut

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Studies that have examined the association between cardiovascular comorbidities and epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) have yielded inconsistent results. It remains unknown whether cardiometabolic disease is associated with EOC in African American (AA) women, who have a higher prevalence of cardiovascular disease and lower risk of EOC than White women. Here, we estimate the effect of cardiovascular comorbid conditions and EOC risk among AA women. Methods: Data were available from 593 ovarian carcinoma patients and 752 controls enrolled in the African American Cancer Epidemiology Study (AACES). Participants were asked to self-report a history of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes and any current medication use. The relationship between hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, and medications taken for these conditions was determined using multivariate logistic regression. Results: Hypertension was associated with an increased risk (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 1.32, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.01, 1.73), whereas diabetes and hyperlipidemia were associated with a decreased risk (aOR = 0.67, 95% CI = 0.49, 0.91 and aOR = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.47, 0.80, respectively) of EOC. Use of anti-diabetic medication was inversely associated with EOC risk, as was use of lipid lowering medications (in the overall study population), which were predominantly statins. Among women with hypertension, use of anti-hypertensive medications was inversely associated with EOC risk, with associations that were most pronounced for diuretics, ARBs and ACE inhibitors. Conclusion: Hypertension was associated with an increased EOC risk in this patient population, whereas an inverse association was observed for diabetes and hyperlipidemia. The decreased risk of EOC identified with use of anti-hypertensive, anti-diabetes or lipid-lowering medications could have implications for risk reduction strategies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)123-129
Number of pages7
JournalGynecologic Oncology
Volume158
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Disparities
  • Ovarian cancer risk

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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