Changes in electronic cigarette use among U.S. Adults by cigarette smoking status, socciodemographics, and subjective depression, 2019–2020

Hongying Daisy Dai, Adam Leventhal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

E-cigarette use increased from 2017 to 2019 and then declined in 2020 among U.S. adults. It is important to understand whether the decline differed by smoking status and sociodemographic groups and whether daily e-cigarette use has subsequently changed. This study estimated e-cigarette use prevalence in 2019 and 2020 by analyzing the pooled National Health Interview Survey (n = 63,565) in 2022. Multivariable logistics regressions were performed to examine biannual change in current and daily e-cigarette use, overall and stratified by cigarette smoking status, sociodemographic factors, and subjective depression frequency. Among US adults, change in current e-cigarette use during 2019–2020 differed by smoking status (cigarette smoking status × year, p =.01) and race/ethnicity (race/ethnicity × year, p =.03). Current e-cigarette use prevalence decreased among current cigarette smokers (11.7 % to 8.0 %, p = 0.0001) but not among former or never smokers, and among Non-Hispanic White adults (5.1 % to 4.2 %, p = 0.04) and Non-Hispanic Black adults (3.4 % to 1.6 %, p = 0.0003) but not among other racial and ethnic groups. Current e-cigarette use also declined among those 25–64 years old but not among young adults 18–24 years old. Daily e-cigarette use did not significantly change during 2019–2020 in the overall sample (2.3 % to 2.0 %, p = 0.10), but declined among adults who were Non-Hispanic Black (2.4 % to 0.9 %, p = 0.0007), aged 35–44 years, and lived below the federal poverty level. Adults with monthly depressive episodes (vs without) continued to have a higher prevalence of current (7.0 % vs 3.0 %) and daily e-cigarette use (3.6 % vs 1.6 %) in 2020. Continuous monitoring of cross-population differences in adult e-cigarette use is warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number102048
JournalPreventive Medicine Reports
Volume30
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2022

Keywords

  • Cigarette smoking
  • E-cigarette
  • Racial disparity
  • Subjective depression
  • Trend

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health Informatics

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