Chemical biomarkers of epileptogenesis and ictogenesis in experimental epilepsy

Hiram Luna-Munguia, Alexander G. Zestos, Stephen V. Gliske, Robert T. Kennedy, William C. Stacey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Epilepsy produces chronic chemical changes induced by altered cellular structures, and acute ones produced by conditions leading into individual seizures. Here, we aim to quantify 24 molecules simultaneously at baseline and during periods of lowered seizure threshold in rats. Using serial hippocampal microdialysis collections starting two weeks after the pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus, we evaluated how this chronic epilepsy model affects molecule levels and their interactions. Then, we quantified the changes occurring when the brain moves into a pro-seizure state using a novel model of physiological ictogenesis. Compared with controls, pilocarpine animals had significantly decreased baseline levels of adenosine, homovanillic acid, and serotonin, but significantly increased levels of choline, glutamate, phenylalanine, and tyrosine. Step-wise linear regression identified that choline, homovanillic acid, adenosine, and serotonin are the most important features to characterize the difference in the extracellular milieu between pilocarpine and control animals. When increasing the hippocampal seizure risk, the concentrations of normetanephrine, serine, aspartate, and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid were the most prominent; however, there were no specific, consistent changes prior to individual seizures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)177-186
Number of pages10
JournalNeurobiology of Disease
Volume121
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2019

Keywords

  • Epilepsy
  • Hippocampus
  • Ictogenesis
  • Microdialysis
  • Nucleus reuniens
  • Pilocarpine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology

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