Chimeric Mouse With Humanized Liver Is an Appropriate Animal Model to Investigate Mode of Action for Porphyria-Mediated Hepatocytotoxicity

Ayumi Eguchi, Satoki Fukunaga, Keiko Ogata, Masahiko Kushida, Hiroyuki Asano, Samuel M. Cohen, Tokuo Sukata

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Porphyrinogenic compounds are known to induce porphyria-mediated hepatocellular injury and subsequent regenerative proliferation in rodents, ultimately leading to hepatocellular tumor induction. However, an appropriate in vivo experimental model to evaluate an effect of porphyrinogenic compounds on human liver has not been fully established. Recently, the chimeric mouse with humanized liver (PXB mice) became widely used as a humanized model in which human hepatocytes are transplanted. In the present study, we examined the utility of PXB mice as an in vivo experimental model to evaluate the key events of the porphyria-mediated cytotoxicity mode of action (MOA) in humans. The treatment of PXB mice with 5-aminolevulinic acid, a representative porphyrinogenic compound, for 28 days caused protoporphyrin IX accumulation, followed by hepatocyte necrosis, increased mitosis, and an increase in replicative DNA synthesis in human hepatocytes, indicative of cellular injury and regenerative proliferation, similar to findings in patients with porphyria or experimental porphyria models and corresponding to the key events of the MOA for porphyria-mediated hepatocellular carcinogenesis. We conclude that the PXB mouse is a useful model to evaluate the key events of the porphyria-mediated cytotoxicity MOA in humans and suggest the utility of PXB mice for clarifying the human relevancy of findings in mice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1243-1254
Number of pages12
JournalToxicologic Pathology
Volume49
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2021

Keywords

  • chemical-induced porphyria
  • chimeric mouse with humanized liver
  • porphyria-mediated cytotoxicity MOA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Molecular Biology
  • Toxicology
  • Cell Biology

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