Chlorella viruses encode most, if not all, of the machinery to glycosylate their glycoproteins independent of the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi

James L. Van Etten, James R. Gurnon, Giane M. Yanai-Balser, David D. Dunigan, Michael V. Graves

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

32 Scopus citations

Abstract

In contrast to all other viruses that use the host machinery located in the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi to glycosylate their glycoproteins, the large dsDNA-containing chlorella viruses encode most, if not all, of the components to glycosylate their major capsid proteins. Furthermore, all experimental results indicate that glycosylation occurs independent of the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)152-159
Number of pages8
JournalBiochimica et Biophysica Acta - General Subjects
Volume1800
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2010

Keywords

  • Chlorella viruses
  • Cytoplasmic glycosylation
  • PBCV-1
  • Virus major capsid protein
  • Virus-encoded glycosyltransferases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology

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