Cholecystectomy and Liver Disease in Short Bowel Syndrome

Jon S. Thompson, Rebecca A. Weseman, Fedja A. Rochling, Elizabeth Lyden, Wendy J. Grant, Luciano M. Vargas, Alan N. Langnas, David F. Mercer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Recently, an association has been proposed between cholecystectomy and various liver diseases. Our aim was to determine whether cholecystectomy in short bowel patients influences the risk of liver disease. Methods: We reviewed 422 adults: 182 underwent cholecystectomy prior to short bowel, 102 after developing short bowel, and 138 patients still had the gallbladder in place. Results: Compared to pre and post short bowel, gallbladder patients were significantly less likely to have obesity (18 % and 21 % vs 9 %), central line infections (59 % and 69 % vs 46 %), intestine <60 cm (30 % and 39 % vs 26 %), and require parenteral nutrition >1 year (72 % and 77 % vs 64 %). The incidence of fatty liver was similar (31, 26, and 25 %). Fibrosis/cirrhosis was less common in the gallbladder group (26 % and 36 % vs 16 %). Frequency of end-stage liver disease was similar (15, 22, and 11 %). On multivariate analysis, cholecystectomy, parenteral nutrition >1 year, line infection, and intestine <60 cm were predictors of fibrosis/cirrhosis. Parenteral nutrition >1 year, line infection, and intestine <60 cm were predictors of end-stage liver disease. Conclusions: Cholecystectomy does not appear to increase the incidence of liver disease in short bowel patients overall. Fibrosis/cirrhosis occurs significantly less frequently in patients with an intact gallbladder.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)322-327
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Gastrointestinal Surgery
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016

Keywords

  • Liver disease
  • Short bowel syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Gastroenterology

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