Clinic function and computerized ambulatory records: A concurrent study with conventional records

James R. Campbell, Charles B. Seelig, Robert S. Wigton, Nathaniel Givner, Kashinath Patil, Thomas G. Tape

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

As part of an evaluation of the effects of the computer-stored ambulatory record (COSTAR) on clinic function, a resident teaching clinic was divided into a study group with access to COSTAR and a control group allowed access only to conventional medical records. Staff attitudes toward use of the computer were sampled and detailed time studies of clinic patient flows were performed. Staff attitudes reflected a high degree of acceptance, favoring COSTAR over conventional records. This was primarily related to improvement in telephone management and demand care. House staff never became facile users of COSTAR because of infrequent clinic sessions. Clinics assigned to COSTAR experienced somewhat longer waiting times due to an increased workload and training effects. Installation of computerized records should prompt a careful evaluation of expected benefits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings - Annual Symposium on Computer Applications in Medical Care
EditorsRobert A. Greenes
PublisherPubl by IEEE
Pages745-748
Number of pages4
ISBN (Print)0818608811
StatePublished - Nov 1 1988
EventProceedings - Twelfth Annual Symposium on Computer Applications in Medical Care - Washington, DC, USA
Duration: Nov 6 1988Nov 9 1988

Publication series

NameProceedings - Annual Symposium on Computer Applications in Medical Care
ISSN (Print)0195-4210

Other

OtherProceedings - Twelfth Annual Symposium on Computer Applications in Medical Care
CityWashington, DC, USA
Period11/6/8811/9/88

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

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  • Cite this

    Campbell, J. R., Seelig, C. B., Wigton, R. S., Givner, N., Patil, K., & Tape, T. G. (1988). Clinic function and computerized ambulatory records: A concurrent study with conventional records. In R. A. Greenes (Ed.), Proceedings - Annual Symposium on Computer Applications in Medical Care (pp. 745-748). (Proceedings - Annual Symposium on Computer Applications in Medical Care). Publ by IEEE.