Clinical differences between nasal and extranasal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma: A study of 136 cases from the International Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma Project

Wing Yan Au, Dennis D. Weisenburger, Tanin Intragumtornchai, Shigeo Nakamura, Won Seog Kim, Ivy Sng, Julie Vose, James O. Armitage, Raymond Liang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

465 Scopus citations

Abstract

Among 1153 new adult cases of peripheral/T-cell lymphoma from 1990-2002 at 22 centers in 13 countries, 136 cases (11.8%) of extranodal natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma were identified (nasal 68%, extranasal 26%, aggressive/unclassifiable 6%). The disease frequency was higher in Asian than in Western countries and in Continental Asia than in Japan. There were no differences in age, sex, ethnicity, or immunophenotypic profile between the nasal and extranasal cases, but the latter had more adverse clinical features. The median overall survival (OS) was better in nasal compared with the extranasal cases in early- (2.96 vs 0.36 years, P < .001) and late-stage disease (0.8 vs 0.28 years, P = .031). The addition of radiotherapy for early-stage nasal cases yielded survival benefit (P = .045).Among nasal cases, both the International Prognostic Index (P = .006) and Korean NK/T-cell Prognostic Index (P < .001) were prognostic. In addition, Ki67 proliferation greater than 50%, transformed tumor cells greater than 40%, elevated C-reactive protein level (CRP), anemia (< 11 g/dL) and thrombocytopenia (< 150 × 109/L) predicts poorer OS for nasal disease. No histologic or clinical feature was predictive in extranasal disease. We conclude that the clinical features and treatment response of extranasal NK/T-cell lymphoma are different from of those of nasal lymphoma. However, the underlying features responsible for these differences remain to be defined.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3931-3937
Number of pages7
JournalBlood
Volume113
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Immunology
  • Hematology
  • Cell Biology

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