Comparing equivalent noise levels and percentile levels in healthcare spaces

Arun K. Mahapatra, Erica E. Ryherd, Howard K. Pelton

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

In complex noise environments, an accurate analysis of the soundscape is often not possible without calculating several different types of acoustic metrics. Collecting percentile levels, such as L10 or L90, in addition to the Leq often provides a more accurate description of the acoustic environment. This is especially evident in areas where a wide range of noise levels are present, such as healthcare spaces. In many situations, it is assumed that on average, the L90 is comparable to the Leq. However, recent research in healthcare facilities shows that the Leq is often closer to L33 or L10. Similarly, Leq in outdoor areas dominated by traffic noise has also been documented to be approximately equal to L33. The relation between Leq and percentile levels of hospital environments will be compared to those of several outdoor environments, such as areas dominated by noise from highways, trains, and amusement parks. This analysis will lead to a better understanding of the impulsive nature of noise in healthcare spaces.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication41st International Congress and Exposition on Noise Control Engineering 2012, INTER-NOISE 2012
Pages8778-8784
Number of pages7
StatePublished - 2012
Event41st International Congress and Exposition on Noise Control Engineering 2012, INTER-NOISE 2012 - New York, NY, United States
Duration: Aug 19 2012Aug 22 2012

Publication series

Name41st International Congress and Exposition on Noise Control Engineering 2012, INTER-NOISE 2012
Volume11

Conference

Conference41st International Congress and Exposition on Noise Control Engineering 2012, INTER-NOISE 2012
CountryUnited States
CityNew York, NY
Period8/19/128/22/12

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Comparing equivalent noise levels and percentile levels in healthcare spaces'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this