Comparing the relationships between different types of self-efficacy and physical activity in youth

Gregory J. Ryan, David A. Dzewaltowski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

52 Scopus citations

Abstract

A preliminary study was conducted to compare the relationships between different types of self-efficacy and youth physical activity. Two samples of sixth- and seventh-grade students (Sample 1: N = 57; Sample 2: N = 49) reported their confidence to be physically active (physical activity efficacy), to overcome barriers to physical activity (barriers efficacy), to ask others to be active with them (asking efficacy), and to find and create environments that support physical activity (environmental-change efficacy). Physical activity was measured by averaging three 24-hour recalls of physical activity. Regression analyses were used to test the relationships between the types of self-efficacy and youth physical activity. Compared with the other types of self-efficacy, environmental-change efficacy had the strongest relationship with youth physical activity. This suggests that strengthening young persons' belief in their ability to find and create environments that support physical activity might promote increases in their physical activity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)491-504
Number of pages14
JournalHealth Education and Behavior
Volume29
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2002

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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