Concentration of dietary calcium supplied by calcium carbonate does not affect the apparent total tract digestibility of calcium, but decreases digestibility of phosphorus by growing pigs

H. H. Stein, O. Adeola, G. L. Cromwell, S. W. Kim, D. C. Mahan, P. S. Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

59 Scopus citations

Abstract

A regional experiment was conducted to test the hypothesis that the concentration of dietary Ca does not affect the digestibility of Ca or P in diets fed to growing pigs. Six diets based on corn, potato protein isolate, cornstarch, and soybean oil were formulated. All diets also contained monosodium phosphate, crystalline AA, salt, and a vitamin-micromineral premix. The only difference among the diets was that varying concentrations of calcium carbonate were used to create diets containing 0.33, 0.46, 0.51, 0.67, 0.92, and 1.04% Ca. All diets contained between 0.40 and 0.43% P. Six universities participated in the experiment and each university contributed 2 replicates to the experiment for a total of 12 replicates (initial BW: 23.1 ± 4.4 kg). Pigs were placed in metabolism cages that allowed total, but separate, collection of feces and urine from the pigs. Pigs within each replicate were randomly allotted to the 6 diets and fed experimental diets for 14 d with urine and feces being collected over a 5-d period. Diets, feces, and urine samples were analyzed for Ca and P, and the daily balance, the apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD), and the retention of Ca and P were calculated. Results indicated that intake, fecal excretion, and urinary excretion of Ca increased (linear, P < 0.05) as dietary Ca concentration increased. The daily intake of P was not affected by the dietary concentration of Ca, but fecal excretion of P increased (linear, P < 0.05) as dietary Ca concentrations increased. In contrast, urinary P output was decreased (linear, P < 0.05) as dietary Ca increased. The retention of Ca increased (linear, P < 0.05) from 1.73 to 4.60 g/d, whereas the retention of P decreased (linear, P < 0.05) from 1.98 to 1.77 g/d as dietary Ca concentrations increased. However, if calculated as a percentage of intake, both Ca and P retention were decreased (linear, P < 0.05) as dietary Ca concentration increased (from 55.4 to 46.1% and from 48.4 to 43.5%, respectively). The ATTD of Ca was not affected by the dietary concentration of Ca, but the ATTD of P was decreased (linear, P < 0.05) from 56.9 to 46.2% as dietary Ca concentration increased. It is concluded that the dietary concentration of Ca does not affect the ATTD of Ca in calcium carbonate, but increased concentrations of dietary Ca may decrease the ATTD of P in diets based on corn, potato protein isolate, and monosodium phosphate.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2139-2144
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of animal science
Volume89
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2011

Keywords

  • Calcium
  • Calcium carbonate
  • Digestibility
  • Phosphorus
  • Pig

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Genetics

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