Consumer acculturation processes and cultural conflict. How generalizable is a North American model for marketing globally?

James W. Gentry, Sunkyu Jun, Patriya Tansuhai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

63 Scopus citations

Abstract

Most marketers in the United States base their marketing strategies regarding ethnic groups on the implicit assumption that an assimilation model exists, that minority cultures will move linearly toward the host culture. We investigate the generality of acculturation models developed in North America to the acculturation processes occurring among the Muslim and Chinese subcultures in southern Thailand. A measure of attitudinal acculturation developed in the U.S. was found to work well across ethnic groups in Thailand, but a language preference measure did not yield comparable data. The behavioral and attitudinal dimensions of acculturation appear to be relatively independent.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)129-139
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Business Research
Volume32
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1995

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Marketing

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