Demographic, symptom, and lifestyle factors associated with cancer-related fatigue in men with prostate cancer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To identify potential demographic, symptom, and lifestyle factors associated with cancer-related fatigue (CRF) in men with prostate cancer. SAMPLE & SETTING: Data were retrieved from men with prostate cancer across the disease trajectory who were enrolled in the Genitourinary Cancer Collaborative Registry–Prostate Cancer. METHODS & VARIABLES: Self-reported data on demographic characteristics, lifestyle habits (smoking history, alcohol consumption, physical activity/ exercise, dietary habits, and vitamins/supplements), and symptom experiences (measured using the Brief Fatigue Inventory, European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality-of-Life Questionnaire–Prostate Cancer and –Bone Metastasis, and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index) were included in the registry. RESULTS: Demographic (younger age) and symptom (sleep quality, urinary, bowel, hormone-related, and sexual activity) correlates of CRF were identified. Higher levels of moderate to vigorous exercise and activities were associated with lower CRF in the sample as a whole. However, there was no association between CRF and physical activity in men with bone metastasis. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING: CRF is a common and burdensome symptom among individuals with cancer and survivors. Identification of demographic, symptom, and lifestyle factors associated with CRF can enhance understanding of this symptom and contribute to early risk assessment and intervention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)423-430
Number of pages8
JournalOncology nursing forum
Volume48
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2021

Keywords

  • Demographics
  • Fatigue
  • Lifestyle factors
  • Prostate cancer
  • Symptoms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology(nursing)

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