Development and characterization of paper products from dried sweetpotato stems, peanut shells and soybean pods

G. Jones, Y. Gan, H. Aglan, R. McConnell, R. Smith, A. Trotman, J. Lu

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

A Tuskegee University research team has developed paper from inedible sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas), peanut (Arachis hypogea), and soybean (Glycine max) plant residues for NASA's Advanced Life Support Program (ALS) for sustaining human life in space. The objective was to develop papers that could be used as a media for inocula and characterize their physical and mechanical properties. The tensile fracture behavior, micromorphological analysis, and fracture surface examination of peanut shells, sweetpotato stems, soybean pods, and a combination of sweetpotato stems (60%)/peanut shells (40%) papers were also investigated. The ultimate strength was 2.6 MPa, 9.2 MPa, 7.1 MPa and 6.5 MPa, respectively. All samples performed well as a media inocula.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalSAE Technical Papers
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1998
Event28th International Conference on Environmental Systems - Danvers, MA, United States
Duration: Jul 13 1998Jul 16 1998

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Automotive Engineering
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Pollution
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

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